Jane Redding (left) John Redding (right)

Daughter Honours Father’s Memory by Donating to The Salvation Army

03
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When it came to making a will, Jane Redding had no doubt she would include The Salvation Army. “My father was a recipient of The Salvation Army’s charity a long time ago,” says Jane. “I know of no cause more deserving.”

In 1930, 16-year-old John Redding left his home in Yarmouth, N.S., for Halifax. He told his widowed mother he would get a job. Not long after arriving in that city his money ran out. He was alone, hungry and homeless. In desperation he turned to The Salvation Army for help. They offered him supper and shelter for the night. The next morning they directed him to the dockyard to look for work. He was hired by a sea captain and that was the beginning of his 40 years as a sailor.

“I was young when my dad died,” says Jane. “But that story always remained with me. Thank God for The Salvation Army.

“I believe in what The Salvation Army does. They are all about helping people who are left out. I think that’s important and it touches my heart. Even though I don’t help them with hands-on service, giving through my will gives me that same satisfaction that I’m making a difference in the lives of children and communities affected by poverty.”

Creating a gift in your will for The Salvation Army is the simplest way to create a legacy of everlasting hope. For more information, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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