Winnipeg booth centre empty shelter beds

Salvation Army Shelter Beds Fill Up as Refugee Claimants Arrive in Winnipeg

03
.10

Since the first influx of people entered Manitoba from the U.S., The Salvation Army has provided food and shelter to refugee claimants. But as more people cross the border, shelter beds at its Booth Centre are filling up and space to house them is becoming less available.

“We have worked hard to make beds available for refugee claimants without impacting our other services,” says Major Rob Kerr with The Salvation Army. “We are trying to make more space for them but we aren’t there yet.”

The centre is currently housing 90 claimants..

“We know there is more that should be done, but we are at our limit with the resources we have and what we can do,“ says Kerr. “What we need right now is financial support.”

Nineteen refugee claimants—two Tuesday night and 17 on Wednesday morning—were rescued while trying to cross the Canada-U.S. border during a winter storm near Emerson, Manitoba.

“This is bigger that what we anticipated,” says Kerr. “I’ve talked to folks in our shelter who have made the trip from Oregon, New Jersey and Texas. It’s not just people in Minneapolis who are crossing the border.

“We are doing everything we can with the resources we have.”

To donate and help The Salvation Army support the practical needs of refugees in Canada, click here.

 

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