The Salvation Army Asks Canadians to “Picture Less Hunger” With Food Photography


Celebrity chef Brad Long’s Café Belong among 16 participating restaurants asking Canadians to tweet, Facebook or Instagram photos in support of hunger awareness

May 2, 2013 – Starting tomorrow, The Salvation Army is asking Canadians to picture less hunger through a week-long social media initiative that turns the simple act of food photography into an opportunity for social good.

Introducing Picture Less Hunger

From May 3rd to May 12th, patrons at 17 participating restaurants in Toronto can take photos of their meals and share them on social networks like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with the hashtag #picturelesshunger and a statement of support for The Salvation Army’s hunger relief efforts. Patrons can also make a personal donation to the organization by adding $2 to their bill, at their discretion.

Picture Less Hunger is a program that takes a growing trend – food photography – and uses it as a vehicle to share an important message about hunger in our country,” said Andrew Burditt, National Director of Marketing Communications, The Salvation Army. “The reality is that over 900,000 Canadians visit a food bank each month, and we rely on the generosity of Canadians to support our services. But that generosity starts with the awareness that hunger is a real, pressing issue affecting hundreds of thousands of citizens.”

Brad Long, celebrity chef and former guest on The Food Network’s Restaurant Makeover, has committed Café Belong at Evergreen Brick Works to the Picture Less Hunger program. “Everyday I’ll notice a group of people taking photos of their food and sharing it through social media,” said Long. “Café Belong is taking part in this program because it turns the simple act of taking a photo into a chance to spread some good, and I have no doubt our staff and valued guests will be on board.”

To learn more about Picture Less Hunger, including the full list of participating restaurants and locations, please visit


 About The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army is an international Christian organization that began its work in Canada in 1882 and has grown to become the largest non-governmental direct provider of social services in the country. The Salvation Army gives hope and support to vulnerable people today and everyday in 400 communities across Canada and in 125 countries around the world. The Salvation Army offers practical assistance for children and families, often tending to the basic necessities of life, providing shelter for homeless people and rehabilitation for people who have lost control of their lives to an addiction. When you give to The Salvation Army, you are investing in the future of marginalized and overlooked people in your community.

For further information, please contact:

Marshneill Abraham (on behalf of The Salvation Army)



Andrew Burditt

National Director of Marketing Communications, The Salvation Army





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