Kids Grow at Camp

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.04


Sophie Murray jumped at the chance to get away from her stressful situation at home, even if for a while. “As a kid, when life got hard,” says Sophie, “I’d repeat to myself, ‘It’s OK. I’m going back to Newport Adventure Camp in the summer.’ Knowing that, kept me grounded. It was my hope through all of my struggles.”

Sophie’s parents’ divorced when Sophie was age seven. This was the start of a rough patch for her. Children’s Aid worked with the family and determined that, due to their financial situation, Sophie was eligible to attend The Salvation Army’s Newport Adventure Camp.

Located in Huntsville, Ont., just north of Toronto, the camp was a welcome respite for Sophie that she relied on for many years. At camp she swam, played games, hiked and made new friends. She enjoyed Bible class as well as her new children’s Bible. Sophie’s family never spoke about God at home and she knew little about religion. One day Sophie realized she had become a Christian. She shared her new-found faith with her mother and they still attend church together today.

As she grew older, Sophie became a life guard, day-tripper and, eventually, a camp counsellor at Newport. “Newport Adventure Camp’s counsellors were all positive role models for me,” says Sophie. “Newport completely changed me, and for the better. It provided me hope and it changed my outlook on the world.”

Now 18, Sophie will attend university in the fall, and hopes to major in international development. She wants to work in the Mission Field.

About Salvation Army Camps
Every summer Salvation Army camping ministries provide close to 4,500 kids nationwide a time of fun, friendship and new accomplishments in a safe environment where they can flourish and feel important.

Not all kids can attend camp away from home, so the Salvation Army’s Camp at Home program comes to them. Over the course of one week, small teams of high energy and creative young adults offer exciting camp-style programs, such as music, sports and crafts, to neighbourhood kids at various Salvation Army locations.

Salvation Army camping ministries rely on generous donors not only to give kids opportunities to experience the joys of camp who might otherwise be unable to, but to maintain and improve facilities and offer quality programs.

For more information about Salvation Army Camps, click here

 

3 Comments

Theodore Marvel

By following events like this, children will get many experiences. They will learn how to lead other people, teamwork, how to make a decision, etc.

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