“Help Give February a Heart” Campaign Positively Impacts Lives


Salvation Army Thrift Stores across Canada want to encourage the public to help better their local communities by positively impacting the lives of those less fortunate.

Through the ‘Help Give February A Heart’ campaign, residents in communities across the country can show compassion and care simply by cleaning out their closets, basements and garages and donating their unwanted and gently-used clothing, housewares and household furnishings to their local Salvation Army thrift store.

“The ‘Help Give February A Heart’ donation campaign offers an opportunity for everyone to help make a difference in someone’s life. With three million Canadians affected by poverty (including 600,000 children) and not able to afford a basic necessity such as clothing, there is a tremendous need for support from Salvation Army Thrift Stores,” said Tanisha Dunkley, national marketing manager for The Salvation Army, National Recycling Operations.

“That’s why we’ve designated February as the month to bring awareness to how important donations are to helping a non-profit operation such as Salvation Army thrift stores,” she added.

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