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Salvation Army Calls on Canadians to Help Fill the Kettle

12
.24

With Christmas only days away, The Salvation Army is calling on Canadians to help fill the kettle. “Every gift makes a huge difference in the life of someone in need,” says Graham Moore, Territorial Public Relations and Development Secretary for The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda. “And The Salvation Army will stretch donations as far as it can, to help as many people as it can.”

Every year from coast to coast The Salvation Army works tirelessly to help hundreds of families find joy at Christmas. Take Shari for example. A single mom with three children, Shari worked shift after shift, day and night, to pay the bills. She barely kept food on the table. As Christmas inched closer she cried herself to sleep because she couldn’t even give her children a turkey dinner. A co-worker became aware of her situation and contacted The Salvation Army. When a large basket of food, and age-appropriate toys for her children, arrived at Shari’s door she wept tears of joy and thanked the delivery person for loving a stranger so much. “We’ll have a Christmas worth remembering,” said Shari.

A large majority of The Salvation Army’s fundraising occurs during its Christmas Kettle Campaign. To date, The Salvation Army has raised $11.9 million through the Kettles, but with a fundraising goal of $21 million, it still has a long way to go.

“Christmas kettle donations remain in the community and help people now and throughout the year,” says Moore. “With Christmas arriving soon, we know we can count on the incredible generosity of Canadians who continue to rise to the occasion, helping The Salvation Army serve millions of people in need across Canada.”

 

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