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Salvation Army Celebrates 130 Years

06
.11

What began in Canada in 1882 with about 30 members has since grown to become Canada’s largest non-governmental direct provider of social services.

In June 2012 The Salvation Army in Canada celebrates 130 years of giving hope and support to vulnerable people at their greatest point of need.

From the beginning, the Army in Canada adopted founder William Booth’s concept of “soup, soap and salvation”, which was to feed the poor, love the unloved and meet human needs in the name of Jesus.

This model took hold across the country and developed into social-service programs that included prison ministries, children’s shelters, hospitals, seniors’ residences, and salvage work, now called recycling, which lead to the Army’s well-known Thrift Stores.

While poverty remains a critical issue in the 21st century, it brings about new challenges. The Army’s innovative and unique social service programs such as community kitchens, skills training and restorative programs for seniors are keeping its work relevant and give strong indication that Salvation Army services will be required for years to come.

Click here for the full press release.

 

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